Heroes of Olympus, Book 1: Lost Hero (The Heroes of Olympus)

Heroes of Olympus, Book 1:  Lost Hero  (The Heroes of Olympus)

“Even before he was electrocuted, Jason was having a rotten day.” What a great first line.


Jason awakens in the back of a school bus, holding hands with a girl he doesn’t know, joined by a boy who claims to be his best friend, heading from who-knows-where to who-knows-where, under the guidance of a baseball bat-wielding chaperone named Coach Hedge, who has a fondness for calling his charges, “Cupcake.” It turns out the bus, containing fifteen or sixteen campers from The Wilderness School (for dangerous teens), is heading to the Skywalk on the Grand Canyon for a field trip. Coach Hedge is a satyr in disguise, charged with the task of protecting Piper and Leo, and now, Jason, until an “extraction team” from Camp Half-Blood arrives.  But, before they do, some venti arrive to attempt dispatching the three. I ask you, will there be any tourist attractions in the United States left to visit without envisioning a mythological battle?


The extraction team, led by Annabeth, arrives a bit late. Jason had already managed to fight the venti off, with the help of Coach Hedge, who appears to have sacrificed himself, but not without surviving said electrocution. Annabeth is furious when she learns that Percy is not among the three but takes them back to Camp Half-Blood, where Piper and Leo learn that they are demi-gods and Jason seems to have all sorts of knowledge but doesn’t remember from where. And did I mention that Percy is missing?


Rachel Elizabeth Dare, the mortal who became the new Oracle, is consulted about whether the Great Prophecy has commenced. When she begins the prophecy, Jason completes it in Latin, but doesn’t know how he knows it. Hera has been kidnapped and it’s up to the demigods to rescue her. Rachel has more prophecies eac
h more dire and confusing than the last, and everyone knows that the jealous Hera is no friend to demi-gods. Could it be a trap?


Old characters return; new ones are introduced; and road trips are embarked upon. The signature wit and action of the Percy Jackson series are all there, which should satisfy fans. New fans should not have a problem starting here, but would be better served if they read Percy Jackson and the Olympians first. I love how Riordan weaves in the similarities and differences and history of Greek and Roman mythology.

 

 

“Even before he was electrocuted, Jason was having a rotten day.” What a great first line.

 

 

 

Jason awakens in the back of a school bus, holding hands with a girl he doesn’t know, joined by a boy who claims to be his best friend, heading from who-knows-where to who-knows-where, under the guidance of a baseball bat-wielding chaperone named Coach Hedge, who has a fondness for calling his charges, “Cupcake.” It turns out the bus, containing fifteen or sixteen campers from The Wilderness School (for dangerous teens), is heading to the Skywalk on the Grand Canyon for a field trip. Coach Hedge is a satyr in disguise, charged with the task of protecting Piper and Leo, and now, Jason, until an “extraction team” from Camp Half-Blood arrives.  But, before they do, some venti arrive to attempt dispatching the three. I ask you, will there be any tourist attractions in the United States left to visit without envisioning a mythological battle?

 

 

 

The extraction team, led by Annabeth, arrives a bit late. Jason had already managed to fight the venti off, with the help of Coach Hedge, who appears to have sacrificed himself, but not without surviving said electrocution. Annabeth is furious when she learns that Percy is not among the three but takes them back to Camp Half-Blood, where Piper and Leo learn that they are demi-gods and Jason seems to have all sorts of knowledge but doesn’t remember from where. And did I mention that Percy is missing?

 

Rachel Elizabeth Dare, the mortal who became the new Oracle, is consulted about whether the Great Prophecy has commenced. When she begins the prophecy, Jason completes it in Latin, but doesn’t know how he knows it. Hera has been kidnapped and it’s up to the demigods to rescue her. Rachel has more prophecies each more dire and confusing than the last, and everyone knows that the jealous Hera is no friend to demi-gods. Could it be a trap?

 

 

 

Old characters return; new ones are introduced; and road trips are embarked upon. The signature wit and action of the Percy Jackson series are all there, which should satisfy fans. New fans should not have a problem starting here, but would be better served if they read Percy Jackson and the Olympians first. I love how Riordan weaves in the similarities and differences and history of Greek and Roman mythology.

 

 

 

I read The Lost Hero twice, once with my ears and again with my eyes. I highly recommend reading it either way. Joshua Swanson narrates and his performance is excellent – well paced and he uses subtle, unique voices. This would be a great road trip audio; one the entire family would enjoy. 978-1423113461   570 pages Ages 10 and up

 

 

Recommended by:  Brenda Kahn, Librarian, New Jersey USA

 

Read alikes:  SHADOW THIEVES (Chronus Chronicles series) by Anne Ursu; GODS OF MANHATTAN by Scott Mebus

 

 

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