Lizzie Demands a Seat Elizabeth Jennings Fights For Streetcar Rights

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In 1854, Elizabeth "Lizzie" Jennings, an African American schoolteacher, fought back when she was unjustly denied entry to a New York City streetcar, sparking the beginnings of the long struggle to gain equal rights on public transportation.

One hundred years before Rosa Parks took her stand, Elizabeth "Lizzie" Jennings tried to board a streetcar in New York City on her way to church. Though there were plenty of empty seats, she was denied entry, assaulted, and threatened all because of her race--even though New York was a free state at that time.

Lizzie decided to fight back. She told her story, took her case to court--where future president Chester Arthur represented her--and won! Her victory was the first recorded in the fight for equal rights on public transportation, and Lizzie's case set a precedent.

Author Beth Anderson and acclaimed illustrator E. B. Lewis bring this inspiring, little-known story to life in this captivating book.---from the publisher

32 pages                                    978-1629799391                               Ages 7-10

Keywords:  African American, women, civil rights, standing up for yourself, role of the individual, power of the individual, 19th century, American history, diverse books, diversity, finding your voice, social activist, social issues, New York, racism, prejudice, discrimination, 7 year old, 8 year old, 9 year old, 10 year old, Social Studies Curriculum, biography, informational picture book, racial injustice

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