Bears Don't Cry

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't cry emma chichester clark

The beautiful sequel to Bears Don’t Read! from renowned author/illustrator, Emma Chichester Clark, creator of Blue Kangaroo.

The crowd went quiet. Then somebody whispered, “Bears don’t cry, do they?”

George is no ordinary bear. He lives with a little girl called Clementine and her mother, who have taught him to read!

One day, when George finishes his book early and knows it will be a long time before Clementine and her mother return home, he decides to go the library by himself. At first it’s exciting to stroll along the sunny street. But poor George’s trip soon ends in disaster and, to make things worse, his library book is ruined. Can anyone help George to feel better when his feelings are hurt?

A heart-warming, feel-good story about friendship, with a powerful and highly relevant message that even big bears can cry.---from the publisher

32 pages                              9780008491833                            Ages 4-7

Keywords:  dealing with feelings, dealing with emotions, crying, bears, library, 4 year old, 5 year old, 6 year old, 7 year old, part of a series

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George is no ordinary bear. He lives with a little girl called Clementine and her mother, who have taught him to read! There was nothing he liked more than to sit in the garden and read once he'd helped out around the house because, next to reading, being useful was his favourite thing to do.

One day, when George finishes his book early and knows it will be a long time before Clementine and her mother return home, he decides to go the library by himself. At first it’s exciting to stroll along the sunny street. But poor George’s trip soon ends in disaster because not everyone can cope with seeing a large brown bear walking down the street, and, to make things worse, his library book is ruined. Do bears really cry? Can anyone help George to feel better when his feelings are hurt?

This is a heart-warming story for young readers who probably wouldn't blink if they saw a bear walking down the street and they certainly wouldn't carry on like the townspeople.  But it is also a timely reminder that some of the things that we say and do can hurt other's feelings, even if that is not our intention, and so we need to think before we speak or act and be sensitive to the feelings of those around us.  For little ones who are so egocentric this is something they have to learn and so this, apart from being just a grand read-together, is a great discussion starter.

Recommended by:  Barbara Braxton, Teacher Librarian, New South Wales AUSTRALIA

See more of her recommendations:

500 Hats https://500hats.edublogs.org/

The Bottom Shelf https://thebottomshelf.edublogs.org/

Storybook Cushions https:// bit.ly/storybook_cushions

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